Maternal Survival - A Holistic Approach

Source - © 2017 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare. Description - A woman breastfeeds her child while waiting for health services outside a health center in Nampula, Mozambique.

Maternal mortality and disability continue to be a major global public health problems, affecting millions of women, families, and communities annually.

This course will help you understand the current global maternal mortality and disability situation, some high-impact interventions for reducing maternal mortality and morbidity, and key issues involved in programming to improve outcomes and save lives. The concepts aim to equip learners with technical expertise to reduce the tragic number of preventable maternal deaths worldwide.

"Women are not dying because of diseases we cannot treat...they are dying because societies have yet to make the decision that their lives are worth saving." — Mahmoud Fathalla

Objective

After completing this course, the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the background and foundational concepts related to maternal health, including the state of the world related to maternal well-being, progress to date, and the future prospect of maternal survival; inequities in distribution of maternal mortality; and the causes of maternal morbidity and mortality
  • Discuss the behavioral, clinical, and health systems interventions that can reduce maternal morbidity and mortality
  • Recognize the barriers to maternal care services related to availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodation, and acceptability
  • Comprehend the means of monitoring and measuring progress towards maternal survival

 

Credits

The following individuals are greatly appreciated for their invaluable support and expertise in developing this course:

Theresa Shaver, Mary Ellen Stanton, Deborah Armbruster, Ruth Madison, Patricia MacDonald, Margaret D'Adamo, Rachel Marcus, Maureen Norton, Laura Itzkowitz, Stephanie Levy, Amy Fowler, Hope Arcuri, Cesi Bosch, Jematia Chepyator, Omar Dary, and Bernard Gonik of USAID, and Jim Litch (GAPPS).

Special thanks to Barbara Deller (ACCESS) and Mary Ellen Stanton (USAID) who authored the previous edition of this course (published March 1, 2012).